log in

“Finding Elusive Records on FamilySearch”

Robert Kehrer
5/14/16

Categories: FS , RT

Talk Abstract:
This class will show what to do when records for your ancestor don’t come up using the basic FamilySearch Historical Records search form. A significant portion of the records on FamilySearch are not indexed and can’t be searched using the form, so what do you do? For a number of historical, technical or genealogical reasons, an ancestor’s record may be challenging to find. This presentation will show some of the common difficulties confronted by researchers and demonstrate how to use the FamilySearch systems to find those elusive records.

Speaker Bio:
Robert Lawrence Kehrer is the Senior Product Manager of Search Technologies on FamilySearch.org . He worked for 12 years as a molecular geneticist identifying disease genes by building very large family pedigrees. He has an MBA and worked for 7 years at Apple managing strategic alliances and driving market strategy in the sciences. For the last 9 years Robert has worked for FamilySearch as a product manager in the Family History Library, overseeing the public APIs, and managing the development of FamilySearch.org beta. His current position as Senior Product Manager of Search Technologies includes the search systems, hinting, the Sourcelinker attach tool, and the historical records image viewer. He was one of the keynote speakers at RootsTech 2016 in February in the Salt Palace and the video of his presentation there is online at https://www.rootstech.org/video2/4741844756001 . He and his family live in Mapleton, Utah.

Meeting Agenda
Click here for meeting agenda for the UVTAGG meeting where this talk or class was presented (will open in a new browser tab).

Viewing of videos and handouts is only available to members who have logged in. If you are a member, please login or sign up below.

Existing Users Log In
   
New User Registration
*Required field

NOTICE:
This presentation is part of a set of over 400 presentations on genealogy and family history produced by “UVTAGG: The Utah Valley Technology and Genealogy Group”.
For full details and to join, see the website https://uvtagg.org.